Browsing 35 posts tagged with Indie.

 
 

Hello

Gosh, this is the longest I’ve went without updating my photo blog. I won’t be making a habit of it, it just so happened I’ve been ‘busy’. (I hate that word. Despite being ‘busy’ I’ve still found time to watch Casey Neistat Vlogs, so it’s less about being ‘busy’ and more about not prioritising taking pictures.)

I have some exciting trips coming up, so that will change. In a couple of weeks I’ll be in New York for my sister’s hen do. When I get back from NYC, a bunch of us avid Instagram users are heading to Isle of Skye for a photo trip. FUN!

 
 

That Office Light

My favourite part of our office space is the light. No wait, the dog. No, I mean the giant bean bag. Actually, I like it all.

 
 

Glasgow Coffee Festival

After missing it last year, I was eager to attend Glasgow Coffee Festival and sample a lot of caffeine. I’m not as tough as I had thought—3 coffees and I was in desperate need of some water. I had two long blacks from Riverhill Coffee Bar and Terrone, and a flat white from Meadow Road. Oh, and carrot cake.

It was the perfect autumn day.

 
 

Love.

When she’s happy, I’m happy.

 
 

This Little Monster

I don’t photograph Indie much any more. Ever since I took a photo of her every week for a year, photographing her became kind of tedious. But then I see her sitting like this, cocking her head in that cute way and enjoying the winter sun as it spills into our living room, and I remember just how photogenic she is.

 
 

Sandy and Jack

Rehoming Indie from the SSPCA was the most delightful decision of my teens. 7.5 years later and we’re still hanging out, causing chaos. In an effort to highlight the option of rehoming a dog as opposed to going straight to a breeder, I am visiting families who have rescue dogs and talking to them about their friendships with these canines. There is a bit of a stigma that rescue dogs can harbour behavioural issues, therefore the option isn’t for everyone, but these dogs can be your best friend – just like a thoroughbred whose history can be traced every step.

First up, Karen and Peter.

(Please note, I do not think there is anything wrong with going to a breeder. I am just highlighting the alternative.)

Why did you go to the Dogs Trust and SSPCA? Why didn’t you go to a breeder?

[Peter] I just didn’t think that was the done thing. When I was growing up we always had rescue dogs. I went along and just sort of started having a nosey. I think I got Jack and Sam before I met Karen, and I got Sandy within the week that we met. So, for me growing up that was sort of the done thing. We never really went to a breeder and I didn’t know much about it, so I just went and had a nosey about. Over two or three visits I went to the likes of Bothwell, Cardonald – the SSPCA places – and one day this little guy (Jack) came bounding out of the kennel, and his tail was going – he seemed really pleased to see me. I thought “That seems like a good one”.

When I went to Cardonald to rehome my dog, Indie, one of the staff told me the dog chooses you. Do you think that was the case with you?

[Peter] I don’t know. Sometimes I can see him being like that with everybody – pleased to see everybody and anybody. He has jumped inside the back of somebody else’s car before. But in that regard, I can see my personality in both of them.

You’re not too concerned with having a pedigree that you’ve raised from being a puppy?

[Peter] Not in the slightest. I always thought Jack had a big smile and personality, smart doggy. My understanding since is that pedigrees tend to have a lot of trouble.

[Karen] I just kind of figure that the start of their life hasn’t been the best and they deserve – just like anything – a chance. And it seems humane to do that.

Do you know anything about their background?

[Peter] Sandy, yes, in that his mum was in the Dog’s Trust when he was born, and he was returned 9 months later because of a change in circumstance. At the time he was the dog they could pair up in a kennel with any other because he was not fussed, happy go-lucky. And Jack… Jack was a stray.

[Karen] Which is horrible. It’s so sad. You wouldn’t do that with a child. I think people need to go through quite a strict adoption process, because you can’t decide after 9 months that you don’t want your child any more. A dog is for life, I think it’s horrendous that people can just return dogs.

[Peter] My sister was telling us that a number of people were like money’s tight and the dog gets ‘lost’ during one of their walks.

Thats horrible. So, they just found Jack on the street?

[Peter] Yeah. I always thought it was strange – and interesting – that they would take the dogs that they found in one part of the city and take them to the rescue home at the other side of the city.

Where was he found?

[Peter] I think it was somewhere like Bishopbriggs. Or maybe that was Sam, I can’t remember.

You went to both Dogs Trust and SSPCA. Was there a difference in process between those two places?

[Peter] In terms of the places, the Dogs Trust was nicer. It was kind of like the Disneyland… I don’t know if I should say that. But, you know, it was nicely designed, whereas Cardonald is more on the functional side. It doesn’t bother me either way. I know it’s nicer (Dogs Trust), but is that really going to matter to the dogs? As long as they’re comfortable and get looked after. The Dogs Trust seem to be a lot more thorough.

Do they do background checks?

[Peter] They do, but if you’ve already got a dog they don’t tend to be too fussed. I think one of the issues that they might have had with me was being on the top floor flat at the time. Given I already had Jack, they weren’t particularly fussed. The neighbour wasn’t particularly impressed, though, but hey!

Why do you think people go to a breeder instead of a rehoming centre?

[Karen] I think that they think if they’re paying £600 for a dog, they’re getting a quality dog, good background, no behavioural issues.

[Peter] New, shiny, out the box is the impression I would get, rather than something that’s a bit of this, a bit of that. But they are the way they are, and the idea of paying £600-900… I think Jack was £60 at the time. Sam was £100 because he was a pure breed labrador.

Oh, so the price at a rehoming centre depends on the breed of dog?

[Peter] Not so much the breed, but whether they’re a pedigree or not.

Indie, my dog, has been through a few homes, and I feel I’ve done something good by bringing her into mine and making that commitment. Do you feel the same with your dogs, or does that not even cross your mind?

[Peter] They’re just there. They’re just with me. That’s how it is and that’s how it’s meant to be. It’s as simple as that.

 
 

Elisha Clarke’s Monsoon Weekend In Glasgow

This weekend saw my friend, Elisha, visit from Ireland. Elisha is a fellow photographer, so I had planned on taking a lot of photos. Sadly, whenever I have a friend travel a significant distance to visit me, Glasgow decides it’s monsoon season. But any weekend I get to eat at Tribeca, Lebowskis and St Louis – and wash it down with a coffee from Artisan Roast – is a good one. Elisha also let me use her 50mm ƒ1.2 for most of the weekend!

 
 

“Sausages?”

It’s been a while since I’ve papped my camera in Indie’s face – especially with the 28mm lens. I think, after 52 Weeks, I had exhausted her tolerance with the camera. Nothing entices a dog to pose quite like the promise of sausages, though.

 
 

Indie: 52 Weeks

Every week for 52 weeks I took a photo of my dog. I thought it’d be a great idea; I was snapping photos of Indie all the time and figured it would be nice to look back on in the future. To begin with I had a lot of enthusiasm for the ‘project’, but towards the end became lazy and dragged my heels. There are some photos here that make me cringe, but pushing myself as a photographer wasn’t what this collection was about.

It’s about Indie and how much she warms my heart on a daily basis, therefore capturing my life with her for a short period of time. I don’t know much about Indie’s background; how old she is or how many homes she’s had (I know I am at least her third, and she is probably about 7 years old now), but I know she is a lot of fun to have in my life and that’s why I took these photos.

 
 

Malia Visits Kelvingrove Dog Park

Despite having a working weekend, I was left to look after my sister’s dog while she was in Ibiza. Malia is a bit of a handful, and my dog, Indie, doesn’t get on with her at all (though Indie doesn’t get on with any dogs). It made for a stressful day! In a futile attempt to zap the energy from Malia so we could get back to work, we took her to Kelvingrove dog park for some exercise. Malia mingled with the other dogs, but Indie – as usual – cowered behind my legs.

 
 
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